Stability Leads to Instability

Important: We categorize investments in two ways. Strategic or tactical; occasionally, they can be both. Most of the trades we cover fall into the tactical bucket.

  • Strategic: Occasionally, we have insight into a specific company or theme and we are willing to make a 5-10 year bet to see if it plays out. In this category, we are looking for a business that has the potential to be a monopoly (legal of course), dominate their category, and build a durable moat.
  • Tactical: For these trades, we have a specific price target to take profits at and a stop to protect our downside. For more information on how we evaluate these trades, read this article.

1. New feature

Our new section is called “The Chartbook.” This is where we will house our charts of stocks and ETFs. It’s a little bare now, but eventually, it will include all Russell 1000 stocks and all major ETFs.

It’s a great place to go hunting for trade ideas. All that’s up now is the major indexes, which are free, but by the end of the next week, I hope to have all major S&P 500 sectors entered.

You can access it here.


The rest of the content is for members only. If you would like to learn more about becoming a member, click here.


Already a member? Sign in to your account.

Spotify vs. the Record Labels. Who Will Win the War?

Table of contents:

  1. Spotify vs the record labels.
  2. Nvidia and the new industrial revolution.
  3. We have become an “asset-light” economy. Quote from Warren Buffett’s annual shareholder meeting.
  4. FAANG stocks were crushed in October. Rally over?
  5. These categories of smart home technology are poised for growth.
  6. Public offerings: How Moderna Therapeutics wants to revolutionize drug manufacturing.
  7. Two signs a recession “might” be near.
  8. Canada is fragile.

1. Spotify vs the record labels.

Spotify's gross margin

The above chart is Spotify’s gross margin since 2013.

As a refresher, gross margin is (Revenue – Cost of Revenue).

From an article by Music Business Worldwide:

During the last round of negotiations with the three major record labels (Universal, Sony, and Warner), Spotify was able to reduce their payout to the record labels from 55% towards 52%. Hence the bump in gross margin improvement

 

The reduction was granted on the basis that Spotify hit steep subscriber targets.

See the problem… The percentage Spotify pays out to the labels has a direct effect on their gross margin.

Read More

Chinese Stocks Have had a Rough Year. Here are Two Ways You can Buy the Dip

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Quote of the Day

An analyst on Apple’s earnings:

“Even though revenue and earnings numbers may be good, a lot of those eye-popping growth numbers were already known and expected this quarter.”

-Darrell Cronk, CIO of Wells Fargo Investment Institute

Our view: The best companies don’t always make the best investments. The price you pay matters.


Chinese Stocks

After a crushing year for Chinese stocks, investors are turning to options to bet on a comeback reports the WSJ (paywall).

What’s going on?

• Chinese stocks have suffered in 2018. Two reasons cited by investors are the trade war with U.S. and poor company fundamentals.

• Bullish options on the most popular Chinese ETF, iShares Large-Cap China ETF (FXI), reached the highest level in 5 years as investors bet on a turnaround.

Follow the money

Fred Ruffy, an analyst at Trade Alert, said some institutional players are positioning themselves for an aggressive rebound over the next two months.

How to trade it

There are two China ETFs we will go over.

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End of the Bull Market?

 

Question of the week 

The WSJ asks:

“Is this a healthy correction in a bull market with further to run, a reset lower in belated recognition of this year’s geopolitical risk, or the start of a new bear market?”

Our view: Trying to figure out how deep a correction will be or how long it will last is a waste of time because it is out of our control. All we can control is our behavior. Let’s focus our attention on deploying money into investments that we believe offer more upside than downside.

Read More

Time to buy housing stocks?

 

Companies to Watch

Paypal is growing at 21% and we still don’t know much about Braintree and Venmo. Braintree and Venmo are two assets Paypal owns. PayPal doesn’t give us much information on the performance of those two businesses. Paypal’s future growth will depend on how well they grow and build defensible businesses with Braintree and Venmo.

Paypal’s three main businesses

• B2B = Business to business

• B2C = Business to consumer

A quick look at their earnings

  • Excluding the sale of a loan portfolio, revenue grew 21%; in line with expectations. EPS rose 17%, beating analyst estimates and the company raised full-year guidance.

Greater opportunities

Paypal’s traditional product is the button you see when buying something online. (see above)

Estimates say this button accounted for 86% of last year’s revenue. However, analysts have good visibility as to the growth of this product, thus there is not much room for upside surprises.

The bigger growth driver for Paypal will be Braintree and Venmo.

Braintree is B2B (business to business) product that specializes in mobile and web payment systems for e-commerce companies such as Uber and Airbnb.

Braintree processed 1.64 billion transactions in the third quarter, up 33% from a year ago.

Venmo is a B2C (business to consumer) product that allows you to pay and request money from your friends. Verto analytics estimates that Venmo has 10 million unique monthly users as of August.

According to the WSJ, 24% of Venmo users have used the app in a way that generates money for the company. This is up 17% from a year earlier.

Both of these products, Braintree and Venmo, have a macro tailwind as both digital payments and the use of mobile apps to manage money grows in the coming years; especially with millennials.

Read More

Our Product Roadmap

Here is a quick update of what we are working on.

We are taking July and part of August to lay the groundwork for several things.


 

A YouTube channel-This will start with a free investing course broken up into five to seven parts. Videos will be posted on YouTube and on our website with accompanying articles and resources.

IGTV-Instagram’s new long-form video content (red arrow, green box). We will produce a daily 1-3 minute show. Each show will focus on an IPO, company, ETF, or chart we find interesting.

Podcast-We will base this podcast on our weekly research. It will start as a weekly broadcast and might expand into two shows per week.

Our goal is to give readers multiple ways to consume our research.

This takes time and planning; which is why we are breaking from our regular research to build the infrastructure and systems to produce this content.

In place of the normal weekly email, I will send my favorite reads of the week until we get back to our normal research newsletter.

Premium members

We are monitoring our positions and will send updates as needed.


If you have any questions, feel free to shoot me an email.

Caleb

IPO Profile: Roku + A Podcast Recommendation

Even though I don’t regularly invest in IPO’s, I keep a watch on ones I think are interesting.

Here’s one I am thinking about.


Roku

Quick facts

Roku (ROKU) is the market leader for internet TV devices with 37% market share. This is the same as last year and up from 33% two years ago.

• Apple is in second with 15% market share; down from 19% two years ago.

• Google’s chromecast slipped to 14% market share; down from 18% a year earlier and 21% two years ago.

• Of all households with broadband internet, 40% own a TV streaming device; up from 6% in 2010.

Roku’s origin story

Roku has an interesting origin story.

From a 2013 article in Fast Company:

“Roku began life inside Netflix as project Griffin. Netflix wanted to build a player that subscribers could hook up to their TV to stream movies and TV shows from the web.

Netflix believed it could fundamentally change how the company delivered content to its customers, who were used to waiting days for DVDs to arrive by mail.

In December 2007, the device was weeks away from launching and Netflix CEO Reed Hastings was having serious second thoughts.”

The problem? Hastings realized that if Netflix shipped its own hardware, it would complicate potential partnerships with other hardware makers. “Reed said to me one day, ‘I want to be able to call Steve Jobs and talk to him about putting Netflix on Apple TV,’” recalls one high-level source. “‘But if I’m making my own hardware, Steve’s not going to take my call.’”

In the end, Hastings decided to spin the company out into a sperate entity called “Roku”.

Read More

Should You be Buying Emerging Market ETFs?

Good Wednesday, hope your week has been productive.

Today | 9 items


1. Chart of the day

(Data: money.net, chart: Axios)

2. Investors are pulling out of emerging markets

Overseas funds are pulling out of six major Asian emerging equity markets at a pace unseen since the global financial crisis of 2008 — withdrawing $19 billion from India, Indonesia, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand so far this year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Why are they pulling money out?

Investing in emerging economies is considered riskier than investing in U.S. stocks.

Since interest rates in the U.S have been near zero since the financial crisis, investors have looked to other countries for better investment returns.

However,

The Fed (federal reserve) has started raising interest rates. In doing so, its attracted money back to the U.S and away from emerging economies.

In addition, investors are worried that trade disputes and tariffs could have a negative effect on Asian economies.

Should you be a buyer?

It depends on your investment objectives. Here are two questions to ask:

• Are emerging markets currently a part of your allocation?

• Emerging markets carry a higher degree of risk. Can you accept the greater potential return for greater volatility?

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How NEXTera Energy Became the King of Green Power

Resources used:

Financial statements | Income, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. You can’t edit but you can copy and make your own.

Funding and capital structure


Who is the world’s largest operator of wind and solar farms? It’s also America’s most valuable power company. Still stumped? It’s by design reports the WSJ.

NEXTera Energy (NEE) has grown into the largest power company mostly under the radar.

Let’s see how…

Three important points to their success

• They were focused on business fundamentals and not the Hollywood status that comes with being a champion for green power.

• Only built new sites after it lined up customers. This way, they avoided debt problems that sank rivals such as SunEdison. Instead of debt, they used federal tax credits.

• Has been led by the same executives for 15 years. The CEO, James Robo, came from GE and preaches financial discipline. He avoids hiring the type of workers who join the industry to change the world. 

Read More

Can iRobot Reach 26 Million Households?

Resources used in this article:

2018 10-k  | The 10-k starts on page 93. The preceding 92 pages are the proxy statement.

Financial statements | Income, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. You can’t edit, but you can copy and make your own.

• 2018 analyst day slide presentation.


iRobot (IRBT)

iRobot (IRBT) is the best known public company and market leader in the consumer robot category. Their most popular product is the Roomba(left picture).

Company overview

iRobot is a consumer robot company that designs and builds robots that empowers people to do more both inside and outside the home.

A more complete overview can be found in their 10-k; pg. 94 of the document. The first 93 pages of the PDF is the proxy statement.

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