Chinese Stocks Have had a Rough Year. Here are Two Ways You can Buy the Dip

👋 Hello from the home office.


Quote of the Day

An analyst on Apple’s earnings:

“Even though revenue and earnings numbers may be good, a lot of those eye-popping growth numbers were already known and expected this quarter.”

-Darrell Cronk, CIO of Wells Fargo Investment Institute

Our view: The best companies don’t always make the best investments. The price you pay matters.


Chinese Stocks

After a crushing year for Chinese stocks, investors are turning to options to bet on a comeback reports the WSJ (paywall).

What’s going on?

• Chinese stocks have suffered in 2018. Two reasons cited by investors are the trade war with U.S. and poor company fundamentals.

• Bullish options on the most popular Chinese ETF, iShares Large-Cap China ETF (FXI), reached the highest level in 5 years as investors bet on a turnaround.

Follow the money

Fred Ruffy, an analyst at Trade Alert, said some institutional players are positioning themselves for an aggressive rebound over the next two months.

How to trade it

There are two China ETFs we will go over.

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End of the Bull Market?

👋Hello from the home office. Hope your week has been great!

On to the update:


Question of the week 

The WSJ asks:

“Is this a healthy correction in a bull market with further to run, a reset lower in belated recognition of this year’s geopolitical risk, or the start of a new bear market?”

Our view: Trying to figure out how deep a correction will be or how long it will last is a waste of time because it is out of our control. All we can control is our behavior. Let’s focus our attention on deploying money into investments that we believe offer more upside than downside.

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Time to buy housing stocks?

 

Companies to Watch

Paypal is growing at 21% and we still don’t know much about Braintree and Venmo. Braintree and Venmo are two assets Paypal owns. PayPal doesn’t give us much information on the performance of those two businesses. Paypal’s future growth will depend on how well they grow and build defensible businesses with Braintree and Venmo.

Paypal’s three main businesses

• B2B = Business to business

• B2C = Business to consumer

A quick look at their earnings

  • Excluding the sale of a loan portfolio, revenue grew 21%; in line with expectations. EPS rose 17%, beating analyst estimates and the company raised full-year guidance.

Greater opportunities

Paypal’s traditional product is the button you see when buying something online. (see above)

Estimates say this button accounted for 86% of last year’s revenue. However, analysts have good visibility as to the growth of this product, thus there is not much room for upside surprises.

The bigger growth driver for Paypal will be Braintree and Venmo.

Braintree is B2B (business to business) product that specializes in mobile and web payment systems for e-commerce companies such as Uber and Airbnb.

Braintree processed 1.64 billion transactions in the third quarter, up 33% from a year ago.

Venmo is a B2C (business to consumer) product that allows you to pay and request money from your friends. Verto analytics estimates that Venmo has 10 million unique monthly users as of August.

According to the WSJ, 24% of Venmo users have used the app in a way that generates money for the company. This is up 17% from a year earlier.

Both of these products, Braintree and Venmo, have a macro tailwind as both digital payments and the use of mobile apps to manage money grows in the coming years; especially with millennials.

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Should You be Buying Emerging Market ETFs?

Good Wednesday, hope your week has been productive.

Today | 9 items


1. Chart of the day

(Data: money.net, chart: Axios)

2. Investors are pulling out of emerging markets

Overseas funds are pulling out of six major Asian emerging equity markets at a pace unseen since the global financial crisis of 2008 — withdrawing $19 billion from India, Indonesia, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand so far this year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Why are they pulling money out?

Investing in emerging economies is considered riskier than investing in U.S. stocks.

Since interest rates in the U.S have been near zero since the financial crisis, investors have looked to other countries for better investment returns.

However,

The Fed (federal reserve) has started raising interest rates. In doing so, its attracted money back to the U.S and away from emerging economies.

In addition, investors are worried that trade disputes and tariffs could have a negative effect on Asian economies.

Should you be a buyer?

It depends on your investment objectives. Here are two questions to ask:

• Are emerging markets currently a part of your allocation?

• Emerging markets carry a higher degree of risk. Can you accept the greater potential return for greater volatility?

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Cannabis Follow-Up, A Long-Shot, and Gold

Good Friday. Here is today’s memo:

Today | 4 items


1. How to invest in cannabis (reader question)

Important

This is a new and developing market. If you are going to put money at risk it needs to be money you can afford to lose.

In addition, you need to have a 10 year+ time frame. If the upside in this industry is as large as people think it is, it will take time to develop and grow.

One thing to keep in mind.

In the U.S., while cannabis is legal in a handful of states, it’s still illegal at the federal level. Some banks and brokerages won’t take the legal and reputational risk of holding stocks that are illegal at the federal level.

Most of the investment products available for retail investors are based out of Canada and trade on their TSX exchange. Recreational marijuana will be legal in Canada sometime this fall, possibly August or September.

I am still new to this space and don’t have any insights yet. I will report what I am reading and a few investment options for you to look at.

ETFs

The largest ETF in this space is ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF (ticker MJ) with $300 million + in AUM. You can buy this ETF at most U.S. brokerages.

The management fee is 0.75% or 75 basis points. For every $100 invested, you pay 75 cents.

Here are the top 10 holdings:

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